HIST 1016: WORLD HISTORY TO 1500

Last Taught: Fall 1996 Time: MWF 9:00-9:50 Place: Adm 403 Credits: 3

Schedule of Readings


Objectives and Expectations

Description and Objectives: This course will introduce students to the origins and early development of selected major civilizations of the world. We will study the origins of civilization and the ways different civilizations have dealt with the basic demands of human existence:obtaining food and shelter, understanding the environment, establishing relations between men and women, caring for children, defending oneself from and attacking others, etc. We will also look at the cultural achievements of these civilizations, which established the traditions underlying most societies today. We will follow the rise and fall of several different civilizations to try and identify the characteristic ways pre-modern societies evolve.

In this course we will learn about a number of different cultures; however, it is impossible to learn about every culture in the world, and it is impossible to learn enough about any culture in an introductory survey. For these reasons, this course will introduce you to the ways historians analyze culture and cultural change. If you know what to look for when confronting another culture, you are already on the way to knowing something about it. Finally, this course will show students how to get information about another culture and/or time period. Students should leave this course with the following knowledge and skills:

Knowledge

Skills

Required Text (Available at the bookstore): Upshur et al., World History, Vol. 1: to 1500 (textbook with map workbook)

Grading

Attendance and participation may affect grade:poor attendance and participation can lower the grade one-half letter grade, good participation can raise the grade one-half letter grade. I may give unannounced quizzes that can also affect your grade. Do your homework, and come to class!

Late Work, Rewrites: The main assignment for this course is the Map Workbook. It must be turned in on the announced dates. Late work will be penalized one letter grade unless you have a good excuse, and no workbook assignments will be accepted more than one week late. You may rewrite up to five (5) workbook assignments. Rewrites are due one week after I return the original assignment. You will also have a chance to rewrite the midterm essay.

Attendance: Attendance is required. I will take attendance each day, and poor attendance (more than five absences) can hurt your grade. Late students will be counted absent for that day unless they have a good reason.

Preparation: You should complete assigned readings before class. If you have questions about the readings, you should write them down and ask me to explain during class. You should take notes on the readings and on class lectures. I reserve the right to give unannounced quizzes to test whether students are doing the readings.

Participation: You are at Teikyo Loretto Heights in part to learn English and in part to receive an American-style education. For these reasons, I will ask you questions in class, and I encourage you to ask me questions. Students who participate by asking questions and contributing to discussions will be rewarded. One way to do this is to write down a question before class and ask me the question during class, as mentioned above under "Preparation."

Field Trip: There will be at least one required field trip with this class. You are responsible for buying a ticket, getting permission from other instructors whose classes you may miss, attending the field trip, and completing any assignments connected with the field trip.

Academic Dishonesty: There are two kinds of academic dishonesty. One kind is when you copy the work of other people, students or authors, and pretend it is your own. I need to know how much YOU are learning in this class, and if you copy someone else's work, I cannot tell how much you understand. For individual assignments, you may not copy from other students, and you may not let other students copy your work. You should use quotations and ideas from written sources to support what you say in written assignments, but quotations should not make up the whole assignment. If you quote from a text, you must state where you found the quotation.

The other kind of academic dishonesty is when you do not do your part in a group assignment. Some of the assignments in this class will require you to work with other people in a group. Each group hands in one assignment, and each member of the group will get the same grade. I expect you to help the group. If you do not, you are getting a grade for doing nothing, and this is academic dishonesty.

How will you know whether an assignment is an individual or a group assignment? Exams and quizzes are individual assignments in this class. You must do them by yourself. The workbook exercises are group assignments. You must work on them in your assigned groups.

If I find you guilty of academic dishonesty, you will have to rewrite the assignment. The second time you will fail the assignment, with no chance for a rewrite. The third time you will fail the course.

Incompletes: I give an incomplete only if a student is unable for good reasons to complete a small portion of the assignments for a course. Good reasons include illness or accident; too much work in other courses is not a good reason. I will not give an incomplete simply because a student is afraid of getting a low grade.


Schedule of Class Meetings and Reading Assignments Objectives and Expectations

Note: All page references are to Upshur. Topics and readings may change during the semester. Verify the following with the instructor. Better yet, come to class!

INTRODUCTION

Aug 26-30: World History and the History of Civilizations; diagnostic examination

Sep 2: LABOR DAY; NO CLASS!!!

Sep 4: Prehistoric Humans and the Agricultural Revolution (4-12)

I. THE FIRST CIVILIZATIONS

Sep 6: The Origins of Civilization (14-15)

Sep 9-13: Mesopotamia (16-25); Egypt (25-30)

Sep 16-20: Origins of Chinese Civilization:the Shang Dynasty (67-76); The Chou Dynasty (76-84)

II. GREAT FAITHS AND PHILOSOPHIES

Sep 23-27: Great Faiths and Philosophies (86-87); Israel and Judaism (86-95); Classical Greek Civilization (96-110)

Sep 30-Oct 4: Hinduism and Buddhism in India (65-67, 111-17); Chinese Philosophy (111-27)

Oct 7-11: REVIEW AND MIDTERM; WORKBOOK DUE

III. THE AGE OF GREAT EMPIRES

Oct 14-18: Defining Great Empires (134-35); The Roman Empire (146-58)

Oct 21-25: The Ch'in and Han Dynasties in China (127-31, 172-85)

IV. DISRUPTION AND RENEWAL

Oct 28-Nov 1: The Decline and Fall of Empires (188-89); The Rise of Christianity and the Fall of the Roman Empire (194-212); Europe in the Middle Ages (212-22)

Nov 4-8: The Origins of Islam (232-35); The First Successors (235-40)

Nov 11-15: The Age of Disunity in China (256-62); Reunification and Renewal (262-77); FIELD TRIP:IMPERIAL TOMBS OF CHINA

V. DEVELOPING CIVILIZATIONS

Nov 18-22: Cultural Borrowing and Cultural Isolation (280-81); Mesoamerican Civilization (280-95); Subsaharan African Civilizations (300-11)

Nov 25-29: Japan (322-32)

Nov 29: THANKSGIVING BREAK: NO CLASS

VI. THREE CONTINENTS:CONFLICT AND CHANGE

Dec 2-6: The Golden Age of Islam (336-46); The Crusades (350-56); The Mongols (356-76)

Dec 9: REVIEW

Dec 13: FINAL EXAM; WORKBOOK DUE

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