HIST 1026: World History since 1500

Last Taught: Spring 1997 Time: MWF 9-10 Place: Adm 403 Credits: 3

Schedule of Readings


Objectives and Expectations

Description and Objectives: This course tries to answer a couple of simple but difficult questions: How did the world get to be the way it is today? How can we think and learn about the whole world? We all know that the world is interconnected, that problems or progress in one part of the world can affect the rest of the world. The world seems too big, though. It is impossible to know enough about every place that could possibly affect us. Adding the history of the world to the present state of the world would only seem to make the problem even more difficult.

How do we answer these questions? One way is simply by learning more about the world. What are the major cultures? How do they interact? What have been the dominant trends in world history, and how have they affected the present? In this course we will learn about a number of different cultures, and that should help us understand more about the world.

However, it is impossible to learn about every culture in the world, and it is impossible to learn enough about any culture in an introductory survey. For these reasons, this course will also try to develop a knowledge of the ways in which historians analyze culture and cultural change. If you know what to look for when confronting another culture, you are already on the way to knowing something about it. Finally, this course will show students how to get information about another culture and/or time period. In sum, students should leave this course with the following knowledge and skills:

Knowledge

Skills

Required Text (Available at the bookstore): Upshur et al., World History, vol. 2: Since 1500 (with Map Workbook)

Grading

Attendance is required. I will take attendance each day, and poor attendance (more than 5 absences) can hurt your grade. If you have a good reason for missing class (for example, illness, accident, field trip), let me know, preferably before the class meets, and I will not count that absence against you. Late students will be counted absent for that day unless they have a good reason.

Preparation: You should complete assigned readings before class. If you have questions about the readings, you should write them down and ask me to explain during class. You should take notes on the readings and on class lectures. I reserve the right to give unannounced quizzes to test whether students are doing the readings.

Participation: Students who participate by asking questions and contributing to discussions will be rewarded. One way to do this is to write down a question before class and ask me the question during class, as mentioned above under "Preparation." Only participation can raise your grade (see "Grading" above). Perfect attendance without participation will not help your grade.

Academic Dishonesty: There are two kinds of academic dishonesty. One kind is when you copy the work of other people, students or authors, and pretend it is your own. I need to know how much YOU are learning in this class, and if you copy someone else's work, I cannot tell how much you understand. For individual assignments, you may not copy from other students, and you may not let other students copy your work. You should use quotations and ideas from written sources to support what you say in written assignments, but quotations should not make up the whole assignment. If you quote from a text, you must state where you found the quotation.

The other kind of academic dishonesty is when you do not do your part in a group assignment. Some of the assignments in this class will require you to work with other people in a group. Each group hands in one assignment, and each member of the group will get the same grade. I expect you to help the group. If you do not, you are getting a grade for doing nothing, and this is academic dishonesty.

How will you know whether an assignment is an individual or a group assignment? In this class, exams are individual assignments. You must do them by yourself. The workbook is a group assignment. You must help your group complete your assignments. If I find you guilty of academic dishonesty, you will have to rewrite the assignment. The second time you will fail the assignment, with no chance for a rewrite. The third time you will fail the course.

Late Work will be penalized one letter grade unless you have a good excuse, and no assignments will be accepted more than one week late. Your group may rewrite up to three assignments for a higher grade.

Incompletes will be given only if a student is unable for good reasons to complete a small portion of the assignments for a course. Good reasons include illness or accident; generally speaking, too much work in other courses is not a good reason. I will not give an incomplete simply because you are afraid of getting a low grade.


Schedule of Class Meetings and Reading Assignments Objectives and Expectations Note: All readings are from Upshur, World History, vol. 2: Since 1500. Readings are subject to change. For this class, the World Wide Web is not a substitute for attendance!

Date

    Topic

Pages

Jan 20-24
Introduction: Thinking about World History
 
Jan 27-31

I. THE WORLD ON THE EVE OF EUROPEAN EXPANSION

The Chinese World I: The Ming Dynasty
466-75
The Chinese World II: The Ch’ing Dynasty
478-89
The Chinese World III: Japan
489-98
Feb 3-7
The Islamic World I: The Ottoman Empire
391-97
The Islamic World II: The Moghal Empire
454-66
Feb 10-14
Sub-Saharan Africa
421-24

EXAM I

 
Feb 17-21

II. EARLY MODERN EUROPE

 
Europe in 1500
410-13, 420-21
The Beginnings of Expansion: From Africa to the New World
424-37
Feb 24-28
Europeans in Asia
446-54, 475-78, 484-87
Absolutism and Constitutionalism in Europe
507-20
The Scientific Revolution and the Enlightenment
520-28
Mar 3-7
The Americas
536-51
The Global Contest for Empire
551-58

EXAM II

 
Mar 10-14

SPRING BREAK

 
Mar 17-21

III. THE ERA OF EUROPEAN DOMINANCE

 
The Liberal Revolution in Europe, 1789-1848
572-99
Nationalism 
599-605
The Industrial Revolution
558-61, 612-22
Mar 24-28
European Imperialism in Africa
637-48
European Imperialism the Middle East
648-53
European Imperialism in Asia
653-60
Mar 31-Apr 2
The Rise of Japan and the United States
660-67
World War I 
667-87
Apr 3-4

NO CLASS!!!

 
Apr 7-11
Nationalism in West Asia and Africa
700-12
The Fall of the Ch’ing and the Chinese Republic
720-25

EXAM III

 
Apr 14-18
The Russian Revolution
725-33
Fascism and Militarism
756-62
Apr 21-25
World War II
773-89

IV. THE POST-EUROPEAN ERA

 
The Cold War in Europe
789-99
Apr 28-May 2
Decolonization I: India
714-19, 806-11
Decolonization II: Africa
811-16
The Triumph of Communism in East Asia
817-24
May 5-9
Shifting World Power Blocs
835-43
The Collapse of Communism in Eastern Europe
847-55
May 12
Reflection: Toward a Global Civilization?
865-76
May 16

EXAM IV (Friday, 8:00-10:00)

 

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